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Read what Tinubu has to say about AMOTEKUN as he makes first official statement

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The All Progressives Congress (APC) National Leader, Asiwaju Bola Tinubu, has called for private discussion between the Governors of the South-west and the Attorney-General and Minister of Justice, Mallam Abubakar Malami, over Amotekun.

He said the foundation of the country had not been put at risk with the South-west regional security outfit launched by the governors of the zone in a bit to confront the insecurity in their states.

The former Lagos governor, however, warned that, that fabric could be torn by what he called the “dangerous rhetoric of those who should know better.”

In his first intervention in the controversy surrounding Amotekun, Asiwaju Tinubu said: “Those claiming that this limited, inoffensive addition to security threatens the Republic have taken themselves upon a madcap excursion.

“Those claiming that the Federal Government seeks to terribly suppress the Southwest have also lost their compass. Those who occupy these two extremes have sunken into the dark recesses of fear and political paranoia that can undo a nation if such sentiments are allowed to gestate”.

Titled “The Public Discourse Over Amotekun,” the statement personally signed by him reads: “Amotekun. This issue has dominated recent discourse and media headlines. Distilled to its basics, it concerns how best state governments can assist with the safety and security of their residents. This is a matter of serious concern entitled to sober thought. However, it has been turned into a political tug-of-war. Fierce, often unthinking rhetoric, for and against, has crossed the lips of too many Nigerians. More subjective talking than objective thinking has been the fuel of this outburst.

“Question those in favour of Amotekun. Most have but the vaguest notion about it. They know few details yet vigorously attribute to its opponents the most negative intentions. Ask those who oppose Amotekun. They are equally ignorant of its provisions. They oppose the initiative not on its merits but merely because it was proposed by their political opponents or because they don’t see an avenue for personal gain from it.

“While colourful, the rhetoric has been disconcerting. How people have mishandled this matter demonstrates that we still have far to go in perfecting this democracy. Too much energy has been spent distorting this issue instead of seeking a resolution that supports local enhancement of security while keeping the constitution intact. If this becomes the standard for how we handle disagreements then we will obscure Nigeria’s path forward with our own rubbish.

“In this matter, I do not see malign intent in the differences of opinion between the SW Governors as authors of Amotekun and the Attorney-General as the primary law enforcement officer of the Federal Government. Shorn of the overly dramatic language, what lies before us is but a step in the evolution of our federalism. This is an opportunity to more clearly define that federalism; but one cannot attain this better, more functional definition through overblown, emotional language. Objectivity and calmness are required. To a significant degree, the enduring quality of our republic will be established by the sagacity with which we handle disagreements regarding the division of power between federal and state governments. Such disagreements are inevitable. This is not the first. Nor will it be the last. We must devote our energies more toward solving problems rather than amplifying them.

“Seeking to fulfil their mandates by helping protect their people, the governors of the Southwest collectively established a program to buttress existing security mechanisms. Seeking to protect the constitution as best he could, the Attorney-General offered his opinion on what he believed the governors have sought to do. No one can blame either party for seeking to fulfil what they genuinely see as their public duty.

“Until now, I have deliberately maintained a studied silence regarding Amotekun. Many have tried to goad my swift public reaction. Those who have taken this road did so not because they care about Amotekun or even the people it intends to help protect. They did so knowing this had become a delicate and emotional issue for many. These cynics did so with the adversarial hope that, in haste, I might misspeak or misstep in a manner they could twist to their political advantage.

“Such people are possessed of a mercenary aspect that permits them to sacrifice almost anything, even jeopardize the very foundations of our political unity, if they might exact personal gain from the upheaval. In that they know no nobler purpose than their own appetites, we should feel sorry for them. However, we must not allow our sympathies for their barren condition to persuade us that there is worth in their destructive misconduct. They must be left to the consequences of their own devices.

“If truly I am a political leader as I am often described, then I have not the luxury of hasty, ill-conceived utterances. There are those who will use inflamed words to spark the passions of others. This may bring transient applause. But when the cheers fade, we shall only have further descended because their words were never inclined toward resolution and long-term improvement but toward short-term popularity and perpetual confrontation.

“I believe in this nation and its benign prospects. I dearly love its people, all of them. Over the years of our existence, they have suffered much. Yet they still hold forth with heroic patience and an extraordinary optimism born of strong faith. To these people I owe my best. I shall not treat them cheaply or bandy their emotions like some errant football. The welfare of this good and decent people is my overriding concern.

“Equally, I do not cow to the demands of those who press for me to make a premature statement on an important issue. Again, that is a game devised by those who care more about political cleverness than the quality of governance. I chose to talk when my position has been made ripe by a collection of the facts and a reasonable assessment of those facts.

“As I view it, this matter can be divided in three major parts: 1) Substantive merits of Amotekun, 2) Decision-making and consultative process and 3) Recommendations on the way forward.

AMOTEKUN, GOVERNORS AND SECURITY

“As the highest elected official in his state and thus the individual embodiment of the will of the people, a governor must view safety and security as a foremost priority, integral to his mandate. To turn a blind eye to these concerns would be a grave dereliction. That the SW Governors seek to work together to complement the extant security architecture is, in principle, a commendable undertaking. In embracing this concept, they have acted in consonance with spirit of their offices for the better interests of their people.

“As Governor of Lagos State, I confronted a burgeoning criminal menace. I could not sit idly in the face of the violence and property destruction that struck genuine fear in the hearts of the people. The police tried as best they could; but their coverage was thin. They simply did not have the personnel or material wherewithal to be everywhere at once. We formed Neighbourhood Watch to help fill the gap.

“Our aim was not to replace existing structures but to complement and augment them. The mission of Neighbourhood Watch was to monitor the wards and neighbourhoods of the state. The group would gather information and intelligence to pass to the police and security authorities. The Neighbourhood Watch also provided an early warning system to keep citizens from harm’s way. The idea worked. Crime and violence reduced significantly. Even the overreaching Obasanjo government did not contend against Neighbourhood Watch.

“Judging from the public statements of the governors, Amotekun is meant to be structured along similar lines. As I understand it, Amotekun is to be another set of eyes and ears to assist the police. As such, it is but the second generation of Neighbourhood Watch expanded to a regional scale. Conceptually, there is nothing wrong with this. It does not appear to insult the constitution. However, my position regarding Amotekun is not blind or uncritical; there are several organisational and functional aspects of the proposal that could cause some problems if left unresolved.

“First, the stated mission is information gathering by civilians. Such tasks are always and everywhere best done in low-key fashion. Some aspects of Amotekun seem to undermine rather than enhance this function.

Second, equipping Amotekun with showy paraphernalia may cause the public to misconstrue the role of Amotekun, incorrectly believing its mandate is more expansive than it is. This possible disconnect could impede the good aims of the program.

“We also should consider that the Buhari administration has approved implementation of a policy of community policing wherein additional recruits from all 774 local government areas will be added to the force to help protect their own communities.

“As the Federal Government emphasizes grassroots policing it is uncertain how well Amotekun can complement the police force as the force moves toward greater decentralisation when Amotekun is organisationally leaning in the opposite way.

“We have been fighting for local and decentralised policing for a long time because we know that too much centralisation impedes performance. In regard to actual performance of its appointed tasks, Amotekun should have focused on grassroots local organisation at the state level without a regional command hierarchy. The regional approach may undermine efficiency. There is no compelling logic why the same personnel providing security & informational assistance in Ado-Ekiti should be under the same functional and operational leadership as those providing assistance in Lekki or Akure. This will not lead to optimal performance.

“The regional approach has only limited benefit with regard to the procurement and maintenance of vehicles and communications equipment because this wider approach allows for economies of scale. The regional approach also helps tackle the growing incidences of interstate criminal activity. Some things need to be corrected before Amotekun becomes operational. If not, it will not live up to expectations. Thus, the current formulation of Amotekun is in need of repair before it takes to the road only to quickly slip into a ditch.

CONSULTATIVE PROCESS BREAKS DOWN

“The governors state that they consulted regularly with the police and security agencies. This was the right thing to do. However, their failure to include the office of the Attorney-General in these discussions is the fount of the current public uproar. This was an unfortunate omission the governors should regret and seek to remedy. However, the conceptual merits and positive functional aspects of Amotekun should not be tainted by this procedural defect.

“While the Attorney-General is a conscientious public servant, he is also human. Not having been consulted, he was suddenly faced with an unexpected public announcement regarding a matter within his official ambit. He likely feared the failure to consult him meant that federal prerogatives were being encroached. To blame him for this conclusion would be to blame human nature itself. Though his negative reaction was understandable it was also unhelpful.

“The Attorney-General acted hastily in rendering a public statement that was more inaccurate than it should have been. Amotekun was never proposed as a “defence” agency; the Attorney-General erred in using this description.

“The use of uniforms and brightly coloured vehicles may not be the best ideas but they do not render Amotekun a defence agency or paramilitary group any more than a designated school van carrying uniformed students constitutes a paramilitary deployment.

“Believing the governors had crossed the line, the Attorney-General should have reached out to them. Before going public, he should have sought a private meeting so that he could have a better factual understanding of Amotekun. This would have enabled him to give the governors any specific constitutional or other objectives he might have. In this way, the two sides would have engaged in private consultations to reach agreement on the way forward. This cooperative process might have helped to correct some of the organisational lapses above identified. Such a diplomatic and wise step also would have prevented the current public acrimony now surrounding the issue.

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR RESOLUTION

“This matter cannot be resolved on the pages of newspapers or by attributing negative motives to either side. The best way to resolve this is still for the two sides to enter private discussions. Either the governors should seek an official but private meeting with the Attorney-General, or the Attorney-General can initiate the contact. Since Amotekun is their initiative, the governors bear the greater onus in seeking the meeting.

“The meeting will initiate further discussion on how to resolve what appears to be a misunderstanding caused by an unfortunate lack of communication. Remedy the gap in communication and the misunderstanding will begin to disappear.

Last, I again stress to well-intentioned Nigerians to shun those who employ heated language to inflame emotions. It does us no good to rush toward exaggerated statements that suggest calamity of the highest order. Don’t allow yourselves to be fodder for those who seek to divide us.

“The fabric of the Republic has not been put at stake by Amotekun. However, that fabric could be torn by the dangerous rhetoric of those who should know better. Those claiming that this limited, inoffensive addition to security threatens the Republic have taken themselves upon a madcap excursion. Those claiming that the Federal Government seeks to terribly suppress the Southwest have also lost their compass. Those who occupy these two extremes have sunken into the dark recesses of fear and political paranoia that can undo a nation if such sentiments are allowed to gestate.

“We are one nation, 200 million strong with 36 states and a great complex of federal authority residing in dozens of federal ministries and agencies. If everyone is allowed their democratic expression, there are bound to be disagreements. This is inherent in the federal structure. Nations that have practiced federalism much longer than us still frequently debate over where the line between state and federal power is to be drawn. They have hundreds of court cases each year on this very issue. Yet they do not attack each other as we do. We must all learn to be more restrained and judicious in our reactions when such disagreements arise.

“Before leaping from our seats to lift our voice to the high rafters in profound indignation, we first would be wise to properly discern the situation. We must ascertain whether it merely is a tempest in a teapot or whether our house and all its teapots are swirling in a real tempest. Despite the ominous headlines and heated talk, an objective analysis points more clearly to the former than the latter. The resolution of this matter is not beyond us if only we allow ourselves to be the democrats that our better conscience and the very documents of our national existence call us to be.

“In trying to help resolve this matter, I have initiated communication with the Chairman of the South West Governors’ Forum, Arakunrin Rotimi Akeredolu, with a view to meeting the South West governors to explore amicable solutions to the avoidable controversy. I am sure that, at the end of it all, peace, security, and progress shall reign in our nation. Thank you.”

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OPINIONS

Nigeria’s presidential flag-bearers and the road to 2023

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The Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC)-monitored party presidential primary elections have come and gone and, as the saying goes, the rest is history! With various candidates pushing private agenda, diverse groups’ interests being articulated, and differing institutional preferences already being canvassed, all eyes are now on the 2023 General Elections. In all, interesting times await Nigerians!

 

That said, it is no longer news that, no matter how difficult it is to measure the impact of religion or religious beliefs in politics in Nigeria, it remains contestable in the public domain. However, the interesting thing is that the candidates of the two foremost political parties are Muslims. As things stand, adherents of traditional and other religions may have to re-evaluate their options, and settle for a compromise. Well, it once happened in Nigeria, with an all-Muslim ticket of MKO Abiola and Babagana Kingibe in the June 12, 1993 presidential election.

 

Except we are being economical with the truth, most of the current presidential contenders have pockets deep enough to prosecute a presidential election of Nigeria’s ‘standard’. Most of them are also popular in their respective domains. So, between now and the election, what is left is for the contestants to test their national appeal and sell their visions to the electorate. Right now, long-term policy statements are redundant with the people. Rather, Nigerians will most probably embrace executive pronouncements that are effective and feasible for all to see.

 

Gone are the days when the intelligentsia would want to pin down a political party, based on ideology. The word, ‘ideology’, is no longer marketable in Nigeria’s political lexicon. As a matter of fact, some political scientists have argued that the concept is dead and buried! But, again, it’s been argued that ideologies don’t die; they may have lost their currency; yet, they still exist – maybe, in their latent forms – to help shape ideas of political parties’ manifestos.

 

Remember Edwin Madunagu and fellow comrades in the early days of the introduction of the Marxian dialectics into the academia in Nigeria. For some of these academics, as it was with their colleagues in other parts of the world, the understanding of extant ‘political ideology’ of a state determines the social development trajectory and its pace in any given society. In the national dailies, Madunagu would clinically subject government policies to the critical analysis and scrutiny eye of the postulates of ‘dialectical materialism’ of Karl Marx. Thus, he would domesticate the Marxian theory and use it to examine the social condition of living of the average Nigerian.

 

Arguably, political manifestos and government policies were adjudged good or bad, based upon the outcome of the review of these academics, irrespective of the type or mode of government: military or civilian. Unfortunately, the trend in public administration has shifted towards market economy; and emphasis on political ideology has waned overtime. When Ibrahim Babangida came, the situation gravitated toward “a little to the left and a little to the right”, with the centre becoming totally disoriented and confused. By a twist of fate, Nigerians don’t even remember the meaning of ideologies or what they are all about again. The sad side is that political parties don’t even feel compelled to come with ideology-laden manifestos again!

 

As at today, the Nigerian society has ebbed to the point of a home-grown anomie; and the only way to arrest it is to truthfully arrest it. By that, we mean a total overhaul, which starts even from the family. Impliedly, whoever wants to rule Nigeria must have a concrete, benchmarked blueprint that must be executable in four years; and must hit the ground running! We have had enough of ‘we shall’, ‘we will’ and similar stuffs which never came to fruition. So, let whoever wins not come up with the present style which thrives mostly on feigned promises. A paradigmatic shift in public administration approach is inevitable.

 

Take for instance, Nigerians will want to know what a Bola Tinubu-led government will do to improve the security situation in the first three months of his presidency. If not, his presidency will be in trouble. To avoid that, all measures that will make terrorists, bandits, kidnappers, even common thieves come to terms with the fact that there is a new sheriff in town must be explored. If he wants to “lead from the front”, let him put on the uniform and lead his troops against the enemies of our land. If Sambisa Forest is harbouring our enemies, let him put on his armour and reclaim it. If he is going to hire foreign Cosmopolitan police, or mercenaries from Sudan, let him go ahead and get them to do the job. If he is going to bring the Sunday Igbohos of this world back to Nigeria and engage them against the murderous Fulanis and killer herdsmen, let him know that there is no time to waste again. Needless to repeat that the long overdue improvement in terms of security can no longer wait!

Nigerians will want to know what a Bola Tinubu-led government will do to improve the security situation in the first three months of his presidency

No doubt about it, Nigeria is wounded and Nigerians are suffering! In an enveloping ecology of poverty, where food insecurity is highly pronounced, citizens are dying young, courtesy of preventable diseases. So, it behoves the incoming government to address the economic hardship currently driving Nigerians mad. The frightening truth is that, if the number of the children of school age currently out of school is not reduced within the first three months of such a presidency, nobody will say that the government is doing anything.

 

A time like this in the life of Nigeria does not call for external borrowings that are not tied to feasible projects. Besides, the day our leaders realize that all they need to do to have headway is managing debts, not surpluses that will end up in some people’s pockets, the better for the system. But if we continue in our old ways, then, Nigerians have a long way to go!

 

One of the greatest problems confronting Nigerians is that our youths are not only unemployed but also unemployable because they lack relevant skills. It is even unfortunate that ability to read and write among Nigerian graduates can no longer be taken for granted. And that’s a big shame!

 

Lastly, let the incoming president know that rekindling the hope of Nigerians does not reside in giving them money. Rather, it should be about vision and creativity. It is about developing people. Lee Kuan Yew has shown that there hasn’t been a developed society without control or vision. In his time, Yew made sure that an average Singaporean child must work towards being a star and useful person in the society. There are academics and ideologists in Nigeria who still share the former president’s dream. They can be of help! Those who have the skills to help us out are still available in our universities and other institutions of higher learning. We need them now to create another curriculum that will get new values inculcated in the younger generations of Nigerians. Enough of eating the crumbs that fall from the tables of our oppressors! Until we go back, fix the basics; rearrange our morals; then, give a sense of direction to generations yet unborn, it may be difficult for dear country to achieve anything.

 

May the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world, grant us peace in Nigeria!

 

KOMOLAFE wrote in from Ijebu-Jesa, Osun State (ijebujesa@yahoo.co.uk)

 

 

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OPINIONS

Why Agege Deserves A Mudashiru Obasa

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By Dare Ojole

Joseph De Maistre, the French polemical author, moralist and great exponent of the conservative tradition, who lived between April, 1753 and February, 1821, is credited with one of the most politically correct axiom that has reverberated over time. “Every nation gets the government it deserves.“

Here, however, we will not be looking at any nation in particular. We will be talking more about Agege, a highly populated metropolitan area of Lagos. It shares boundary with Ikeja, the heart of Lagos where government decisions are taken. As we have seen today, it is only a mischief-filled person who is not blessed with a heart that recognises development and progress that would not see the good that Agege has become.

Recently, Agege was described, figuratively, as a small London by an aide of the Speaker of the Lagos State House of Assembly, Rt. Hon. (Dr) Mudashiru Obasa. And this has not been disputed by anyone. What is also not in dispute is that Agege never had it this good. Its nearness to the seat of power, in terms of distance, had only a minor influence on its growth. Before the emergence of Obasa as Speaker, Agege was just there – on a ‘straight line’ not curving upwards.

Even the stunchest of critics understands inside him that Pen Cinema used to be a heartache for motorists and users. You could remain on a spot for many minutes in the midst of an endless crowd of street traders and pedestrians. A distance of less than one kilometre could cost you two hours of your time. With a bridge that was unveiled in 2021, Pen Cinema now has a road network that has been declared of international standard. Obasa happened to the road positively.

This is just one. Agege has some of the best road networks in today’s Lagos. Any need mentioning other areas of success? Check out the push by the Speaker to ensure the education of the majority. This drive is a topic on its own.

When Obasa, a quiet down-to-earth figure, decided to take the mantle of leadership of the legislative arm of government of Lagos in 2015, many, especially the apolitical residents of the State must have laughed it off. They must have thought he was only seeking power for himself. The man knew his direction. He understood what Agege wanted and he knew that such a vantage position would make it easy to attract the dividends of democracy to his people. Today, these same residents now champion the “Speak Again” mantra. They have seen the result, the influence that such a position wields and ushers.
It is easy to hear “Agege l’oga wa”. This translates to “Agege is where the boss comes from.” Obasa towers, politically, above his physical size.

The Neighborhood Safety Corps, initiated through a bill by the Speaker, today has thousands of employees and effectively complements other security agencies. The Lagos Sports law is another that has expanded youth participation in the scheme of progress. Get to Agege and see how the youth speak glowingly and excitedly about Obasa.

For those who find it mysterious that Obasa has continued to earn the mandates of the people without much hassles, the least is to try and understudy what makes the Speaker thick among his people. Despite the nature Nigeria’s politics, Obasa remains one of the small number of political office holders in Nigeria who could be in the midst of his Agege residents without any safety concern. A Speaker, he continues to live with the people, sharing in their challenges and seeking the best for them. He has never been known to run from his constituents only to return at the twilights of election. Does that sink?

Why do you then think he will not continue to get the mandates of the people anytime he desires to serve them? The primary election of the All Progressives Congress (APC) held recently in the co…

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OPINIONS

WOMEN who want to be President in 2023

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INEC Announces Date For 2023 General Elections which will be held in Nigeria on 18th February 2023 to elect the following:

1. The President and the Vice President

2. Members of the Federal House of Representatives, and

3. The Senate

That of the Governors and the State Houses of Assembly will hold on 4th March, 2023.
WINNERS will be inaugurated on 29th May 2023.

LIST OF WOMEN WHO HAD BEEN NIGERIA’S PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES

Historical Background in Nigeria

Dr. Sarah Jibril is Nigeria’s first female presidential candidate both at the primaries and main elections, having run for president on four occasions. She contested under the Social Democratic Party (1992) and People’s Democratic Party (1998–2015).

Prof. Remi Comfort Sonaiya joined her as the second candidate in 2015 under hrr KOWA party while she herself again, along with Funmilayo Adesanya-Davies, Obi Ezekwesili, Elishama Rosemary Ideh, Iwuagwu-Emihe  and Eunice Atuejide were out in 2019 elections to contest the presidential election.

Ahead of the 2023 general elections, there are six female presidential aspirants, who have declared as Presidential aspirants, that they are interested and want the Aso Rock job. Find the list below:

1.  Mercy Funmilayo Adesanya-Davies
An Academic, Linguist and Communication Arts expert, Educationalist, Writer and Poet.
(People’s Democratic Party (PDP).

2. Joyce Ogochukwu Nsaka
Founder of Sozo Women Foundation.
(The African Democratic Congress (ADC).

3. Cesnabmihilo Dorothy Nuhu-Aken’Ova
SRHR, Population  and Development Expert.
(Social Democratic Party (SDP).

4. Ann Dozie-Enukora
HR Professional Nigerian Upstream Petroleum Regulatory Commission (Defunct DPR), Department of Petroleum Resources. (All Progressives People’s Party (APC).

5. Elizabeth Emmanuel
Experienced Local government coordinator/ Local government chairman (ACCORD Party).

6. Khadijah Okunnu-Lamidi
Media Entrepreneur and Youth Development Advocate.

At the time of writing, there are six female aspirants for 2023, as in 2019 candidates compared to the previous elections in which there was only one female in 2015; and 2011 election had only one female candidate.

Female For Nigerian President?

As the 2023 elections draw closer, most Nigerians have expressed their disappointment in the Buhari administration. Would you rather vote for a female presidential candidate in 2023?

….Watch out for more …..  And tell us which of them you would support?

FIVE Women who had wanted to take over Buhari’s job in 2019

Meet the five female presidential aspirants who jolted for Buhari’s job at the 2019 poll.

With barely seven months to the 2019 general elections, some Nigerian women had declared their intentions to unseat President Buhari — a clear indication that not all women belong only to kitchen, living room and the other room.

Five women had joined the male dominated race for the position of Nigeria’s President come 2019.

These women have sighted unemployment, reduction in the standard of living of Nigerians, and very serious insecurity as part of the reasons for their action.

Take a look at those women who had hoped to “sack” President Buhari from the Aso Rock Presidential Villa in 2019.

1. Funmilayo Adesanya-Davies

Mercy Olufunmilayo Adesanya-Davies, is a Professor of Language and Communication Arts at the Rivers State University of Education.

The 55-years old then, now 60 years who hails from Irra, Kwara State holds a B.A at Unife, Masters in English Language, Ph.D in Applied Linguistics & Communication Arts and Doctor of Divinity (D.D) degree and Professor of Divinity (Honoris Causa) Awards of North-western Christian University, Florida, United States of America.

Professor Adesanya-Davies is also a cleric and founder of the Agape Bible Church, Port Harcourt.

“I am aspiring to be the next president of Nigeria. I am out to put laughter of joy on the mouth of all,” she said.

Adesanya-Davies said she wanted to be former president Goodluck Jonathan’s running mate in 2015, adding that Patience Jonathan has endorsed her presidential ambition.

“2015 was when I first thought about being a presidential aspirant. This is the main reason: That I am capable and destined to do the job and that I was born October 15th and I got married on October 15th. – Everything about me is just 15th  and Buhari declared his candidacy on my birthday, on October, 15th. I had said to President Goodluck Jonathan in the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP), I was going to be his running mate. I told him to let Vice President Namadi Sambo step down for me.

“But delay is not denial. That is why I am staging a come-back. I have done some consultations. The first person to put a call through was Patience Jonathan. I told her that I am picking the presidential form this time around and she endorsed my decision,” she announced.

The cleric also spoke about President Buhari. “Buhari’s governance has to take positive reminiscences to Goodluck Jonathan. An old man cannot combine minister for petroleum ministry with the presidency and it will work. We need them to work hard and get the technocrats to do their jobs again,” she declared.

Adesanya-Davies was of PDP but later went to pitch her tent with Mass Action Joint Alliance (MAJA) where she emerged as the flag bearer of the party and contested 2019 election as a presidential candidate. She is currently contesting under PDP for the No 1 job again. PMA-CHOICE agenda is  tagged ADVANCED RESTRUCTURING AGENDA. Now she says, “I have a dream, that one day, I will become the president of Nigeria,  and the time is now”.

 

2. Oluremi Comfort Sonaiya

After a somewhat unsuccessful aim at the 2015 presidency in 2015, Remi Sonaiya made a second attempt at Nigeria’s top job – that of the President, in her party KOWA, in 2019 but could not secure the ticket as in 2015 as a flag bearer.

Sonaiya was 63, is an educationalist, writer and founder of the KOWA Party.

She holds a Ph.D in Linguistics from Cornell University in America.

Sonaiya believes leadership is Nigeria’s biggest problem, a quality she promises to provide if she becomes President in 2019.

 

3. Elishama Rosemary Ideh

Elishama Rosemary Ideh ran for the position of Nigeria’s president on the platform of the Alliance for New Nigeria (ANN).

In fact, Ideh said she will defeat President Buhari and all other presidential aspirants in 2019 but she couldn’t.

You heard that right:

Ideh says, she would provide articulated workable solutions to address the myriad of problems confronting Nigeria.

“We will confront the monster of corruption with utmost vigour, but with a different mind-set from past and current efforts. We will fight corruption in all its tangible and intangible manifestations. We will strive to enhance the Independence and autonomy of the EFCC in terms of its funding, privileges, powers and even the composition of its leadership,” she said.

“Unlike our opposition, who seek to use the EFCC as an attack dog to fight their opposition while shielding their friends from the consequences of corruption and other misdemeanours, we are confident in giving the EFCC the latitude it needs to carry out its statutory mandate and to prosecute cases without bias or prejudice, simply because we have nothing to hide.”

“Nigeria needs a leader who combines integrity with intelligence and a deep and vast understanding of the implications of the 21st global economy and Nigeria’s place in it,” she added.

 

4. Adeline Iwuagwu-Emihe

Adeline Iwuagwu-Emihe, an American-trained political administrator  also eyed President Buhari’s job in 2019.

She ran on the platform of the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) alongside Atiku Abubakar and others.

Iwuagwu-Emihe, had released a ten-point transformational and developmental agenda she hopes to “vigorously” pursue if given the presidential mandate.

“I believe that with the right leadership, equitable distribution and management of the nation’s given natural and human resources, it is possible to adequately provide for all citizens both big and small.

“Although the nation’s constitution is limited in its pagination, it is huge in its provision for equity and justice for all the people. We must use it as the common ground to love and care for one another,” she added.

She expressed her desire and unquantifiable zeal to innovate the country in alignment with the modern socio-political, agro-economics, educational, infrastructural, industrial, judicial, security, technological and quasi-evolutionary process if offered the opportunity by 2019.

 

5. Eunice Atuejide

Eunice Atuejide, 39, now 44 years was the founder of the National Interest Party (NIP).

Atuejide is the presidential flagbearer of the NIP.

A legal practitioner, Atuejide has also travelled to at least seventy-six countries and a hundred and thirty cities across the globe.

She speaks Igbo, Yoruba, German, English and French fluently. Atuejide owns EB Consults Limited – a consultancy company in Nigeria and the United Kingdom.

(Culled from: July 23rd 2018, 3:25:08 pm).

 

The Calendar and Political Itinerary for 2022 in Nigeria

1. Consultation continues January : 1-31

2. Intensive consultation continues February: 1-28

3. March: INEC give guideline for aspirants, candidates, parties in respect of congress, primary election and campaign.

4. April: Campaign for Presidential and Gubernatorial elections.

5. May: Party Congresses.

6. June: Party Primary Elections.

7. July: Petitions on Primary elections.

8. August: Court of Appeal hearing on Primary elections conducted.

9. September: Supreme Court verdict on all Primary elections. Candidates & winners for Presidential & Gubernatorial flag bearer of Parties contesting.

10. October: Aggressive campaign by candidates/Parties across the federation.

11. November: Campaign continues.

12. December: Peace Accord signed by all presidential and Gubernatorial candidates.

13. February 2023: Presidential and National Assembly elections

14. March 2023: Gubernatorial and State Assembly elections.

Early preparation is the best… Be guided accordingly!

No time for procrastination!

 

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